Natural gas: exporting our "energy independence"

by TXsharon on February 4, 2011

in LNG


Just to give you an idea of how deep the bull$hit is surrounding natural gas, they plan to export our energy independence and national security. That way they get relief from the gas bubble and drive those low prices back up.

Companies requesting blanket and/or long-term permits to export liquid natural gas (LNG). It’s a long list.

Encana interested in exporting natgas as LNG from U.S.

Chesapeake Energy wants to export LNG

Chinese stake out Chesapeake


Chesapeake CEO outlines “holy grail” for natural gas:

He said the U.S. by then could have in place an infrastructure for conversion of natural gas to liquid form, potentially for use as a motor fuel, and for export to foreign countries as liquefied natural gas (LNG).

Firm Would Export U.S. Natural Gas to China:

Macquarie Energy and Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P. to Jointly Develop U.S. LNG Export Project

Booming U.S. Gas Industry Becoming an American Energy Exporter

Monday, Macquarie Energy and Freeport LNG announced plans to jointly develop a $2 billion project to liquefy, market and export 1.4 BCF gas/day.

Shale gas popularity rising but experts remain divided

China and India see what the US doesn’t – the potential of natural gas

China Buys U.S. Assets with its Surplus Dollars

U.S. sends first gas to NW Europe in 50 years


Commentary: U.S. Exports of Coal & Natural Gas

U.S. has surprisingly become a significant energy exporter…There’s another area for potential growth — natural gas. Just a few years ago, companies were building terminals along the coast to facilitate the importation of clean- burning liquefied natural gas or LNG

Shale Gas: Not An Overnight Success

LNG re-exports signal US shale gas impact


LNG Industry To 2016 – Increasing Gas Supply Challenges Future Growth Prospects

The (Shale) Gas Renaissance

What if the U.S. Became a Net Exporter of Liquefied Natural Gas?

Shell: We’ll produce more gas than oil by 2012

North America: The new energy kingdom

“Within a decade,” Mr. Forbes said, “the U.S. will be a major natural gas exporter.” And China will be a major importer…”

Cheniere Plans to Export U.S. Gas Into Caribbean Power Markets, CEO Says

Another publication discovers U.S. on verge of energy independence without green fuels

Within a decade or so, North America will almost certainly emerge as the world’s biggest supplier and exporter of reasonably cheap energy.

With natural gas glut, firms bank on exporting

Freeport/Macquarie to Build LNG Export Terminal in Texas

Project aims to liquefy U.S. natural gas

If Freeport and Macquarie are able to sign up customers committed to buying the LNG for up to 20 years, they will use those commitments to fund the project through U.S. debt markets

Glut prompts project to chill natural gas for export

…ship some of that LNG back overseas because of overproduction of the fuel in the U.S

Okay, there is a lot more but I’m tired of this. Just think of all the drilling and fracking and pipelines and compressor stations and collection facilities and processing plants and etc., it will take to support all that exportation of our energy independence.

{ 5 comments… read them below or add one }

Anonymous February 4, 2011 at 2:36 am

Capitalism on steriods. I wonder where the 'roid rage will come from first?

Reply

TadGhostHole February 4, 2011 at 2:38 am

YAY! America can become a third world gas hole for the sake of the rest of the world. With globalization E'rybody wiiiins

Reply

greenfrog February 4, 2011 at 5:34 am

Please explain why Texas is buying electricity from Mexico, while we have power plants sitting idle because they can not get any natural gas because it is rationed, all the while, we are sending our reserves out of the country. Energy independence from foreign sources, NOT! It all goes to the highest bidder, while we get the steamy pile of propaganda BS and rolling blackouts, because the giant energy producing Texas bends over to big energy while screwing their fellow Texans!

Reply

Mike H. February 4, 2011 at 1:12 pm

Sounds like they are gaming Texas electricity like they did in California in 2000.

Reply

Anonymous February 4, 2011 at 7:00 pm

I am generally against exporting our natural resources–especially energy! If LNG is to be exported there should be a great big 'ole EXPORT TAX placed on this exported resource! This tax will provide a proper disinsentive for such activity. Further, we, the peasants will pay the pollution penality because we are living in the gas patch in Texas! Let's get the TAX AX going!

Reply

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